Greenways

Greenways are corridors of protected open space used for conservation and recreation.

Greenways often follow natural features and link neighborhoods to nature reserves,parks, schools,cultural features, and historic sites. Greenways can be publicly or privately owned, or the result of public/private partnerships.

Some greenways include trails, others do not. Some appeal to people, others attract wildlife. From downtown to the rural countryside, greenways will provide a vast network linking Lexington’s special places.

Greenways provide a quality of life that is cherished by many people but, unfortunately, is largely unavailable in Lexington. Open spaces have disappeared at an alarming rate to make room for new development in our community.

Citizens have said ‘yes’ to preserving open spaces, greenways, farmlands, and other important habitats. Greenways provide what many Lexingtonians seek: close-to-home recreational areas, historic preservation, educational experiences, natural landscapes, and beautification.

Both trails and greenways help communities build pride by ensuring that their neighborhood are good places to live, so that everyone can safely walk or bike to a park, school, or to a neighbor’s home.

Gleneagles Greenways

Gleneagles has over 30 acres of greenways located along 3 small streams throughout the neighborhood. They are all  owned by the Lexington Fayette Urban County Government, (LFUCG) and are open to the public and homeowners for  open space and passive recreation. They are also designated  as flood plains and, as such, have an important function in the LFUCG’s storm water management plan. All of the greenways are considered important wildlife habitat areas. Each greenway has a slightly different management plan based on the ecological conditions of each area.

For more information about the greenways please visit the greenway site from LFUCG HERE.

Shaker Run Rd

3The Shaker Run Greenway contains about 10 acres and is located between the homes on Shaker Run and Roundway Down Lane. It is mostly covered with warm season grasses and wildflowers. The grasses and small trees were planted about 8 years ago and are now beginning to blend into the existing trees along the stream bank buffer. Our HOA maintains a 1-mile grass-covered loop trail in this greenway and have installed bat boxes to attract colonies of bats to control mosquitos instead of using chemicals. Adjacent homeowners are allowed to roam in the greenway,but are not allowed to mow beyond the trail, dispose of yard waste,soil, rocks or any other debris in the greenway.

Sunningdale

5The Sunningdale Greenway is about 10.2 acres and is located between the homes on Sunningdale, Shaker Run, Dunhill and Caversham Park Lane. This greenway is covered with mature trees and an understory of flowering trees and shrubs. There are also, 2 old ponds that are filled with cattails and very little water surface. There is no formal walking path, but neighbors can walk along the 25 foot “no-mow” stream bank buffer area. There are 2 bat boxes in this greenway. Dumping of yard waste or any other debris is prohibited.

Royal Troon

4The Royal Troon Greenway lies south of Polo Club Blvd and borders with the next subdivision called Homeplace, I-75 and Royal Troon Rd. This greenway has a variety of landscapes including woodlands, open fields and a 2 acre pond shared with the Homeplace. The shared site is about 10 acres and is rectangular in shape rather than linear like the other two. The site is connected to Polo Club by an 8-ft wide paved trail that also connects to the paved East Brighton Rail-Trail. The 2.5 mile Brighton trail connects an undeveloped park on Deer Haven Lane with Man-o-War Blvd. and will eventually extend to Winchester Rd. and Downtown. This greenway is maintained by the LFUCG and no mowing or dumping of any kind is permitted.